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aloepp 06-20-2020 07:28 PM

Thoughts on switching to an outdoor kitchen...
 
Hello! I am new here and am enjoying reading through all the forums for tips and tricks.

My fiancť and I recently bought a 1977 Beachcomber that overall is in pretty good condition and really just needs a good makeover. The plan is to take a road trip from Vancouver down the coast to the Pacific Coast Highway for our honeymoon after our wedding next summer (fingers crossed covid will allow this...)

My dad is a carpenter so with his help and direction we decided to gut the interior and start from scratch to make things more functional. We are currently in the planning stage and are considering what to do about the interior kitchen. To make better use of the space I am thinking that we may move to an outdoor cooking set up rather than re-install the burner and sink. Matt and I are both over 6 feet tall so actually can't stand up straight to be able to cook comfortably anyway! We tent camp a lot and enjoy cooking outdoors so this wouldn't be new to us. We would still have a countertop space and a fridge but that would basically be it for interior amenities.

I wonder though what your thoughts here are about this in terms of down the line re-sale value. Would it be ill-advisable to not include these amenities?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

AL

Donna D. 06-20-2020 07:48 PM

My thoughts... your trailer make it your own. HOWEVER, remember just because you have it doesn't mean you have to use it. SO, while you think you'll ALWAYS cook outside, that is ALL weather dependent. You're talking about traveling the Pacific coast hwy. It's not unusual to have summer squalls on the coast... and that comes with wind. Would you really cook outside in that weather? Think of your future and what you want that to look like. Will you always be able to cook outside?


Good luck :thumb

aloepp 06-20-2020 08:10 PM

Thanks Donna for your reply. These are all very good points. We want to add an awning to protect from rain but hadn't necessarily though of the wind! We will definitely take this into consideration.

Thanks again,

AL

Byron Kinnaman 06-20-2020 09:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aloepp (Post 782622)
Thanks Donna for your reply. These are all very good points. We want to add an awning to protect from rain but hadn't necessarily though of the wind! We will definitely take this into consideration.

Thanks again,

AL

wind and awnings do not play well together.

Glenn Baglo 06-20-2020 09:18 PM

4 Attachment(s)
There have been occasions where supper was a can of beans, cooked in a pot, on the stove inside the trailer, wind and rain howling outside. We have a three-burner stove inside and have never used more than two burners. But outside, I have two single-burner butane stoves and a two-burner BBQ. The BBQ can be used to cook steaks on high heat, or to roast a whole chicken indirect ( chicken on the unfired side ).

PatrickTXFL 06-21-2020 09:12 AM

I think as well its your trailer build it your way, however if rebuilding and thinking resale then installing either original or similar items in new counter would be a right way to go IMO. My case I used new sink for upgrade and reused my stove as it was modern in my new countertop. Since your plans would be use only for bad weather (which is the way a lot of people do it) I would suggest while you have a good helper build some cutting board covers so you can use as all counter space until your bad weather day hits. I have both a store bought bambo and plastic commercial size cutting boards so I can cover the sink and stove, both have rubber feet so I feel comfortable setting something heavy on top of stoves glass cover.

Retired Brian 06-21-2020 10:05 AM

No inside cooking
 
We bought a new Outback Trillium in 2009. We had it modified to remove the stove, fridge, heater and chose to use the galley space only for storage. We cook outside on a two burner hotplate, a small hibachi and also carry a small microwave in the back of our car in the event we need it. A couple of coolers and a small ceramic heater cover off the fridge and furnace.

We have done several 2-3 month trips covering the western states and 2 six month trips that have covered the rest of the continental USA. We have touched every state, every MLB ball park, most Civil War parks etc etc. We have well over 100K miles on our wee trailer and have never cooked inside. We are not off-road campers, typically staying in KOA, Good Sam, Passport America and State Parks, and have always found some sort of eatery nearby if the weather is too inclement to cook outside. If you are traveling the west coast you will pass many Fred Meyer stores that have baked chicken pieces and deli counter selections that make for excellent, inexpensive and easy to obtain meals.

So, we don't cook inside but will eat inside if the weather suggests it might be a good idea.

Have fun and good luck with your future travels.

Jon in AZ 06-21-2020 10:15 AM

The smaller the trailer the less important is full self-containment- including a complete galley- in terms of resale. I agree that being able to prepare and eat simple meals inside is a valuable thing for bad weather days. As long as you have a decent-sized counter, a butane burner and/or induction plate and a wash basin will serve. One advantage of not having a permanent stove and sink is you can stow the basin to make more room for cooking and stow the burner to make more room for clean-up. And you can take it all outside when the weather is nice, so thereís no duplication of appliances.

One safety warning on the butane burners... You cannot use larger pots that overhang the fuel canisters.

bobblangley 06-21-2020 11:20 AM

We cook outside every chance we have -- it's a nicer environment, cleanup is way easier, we don't fill up holding tanks -- which turns out to be the vast majority of the time. Even though inside the trailer we have a complete set of everything needed to cook and clean, I have accumulated a second set that I keep in the back of the truck and can just pull out and set up on a table. Prior to that, it seemed that we were always going back and forth to the trailer for some needed item.

neparker 06-21-2020 11:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jon in AZ (Post 782683)
The smaller the trailer the less important is full self-containment- including a complete galley- in terms of resale. I agree that being able to prepare and eat simple meals inside is a valuable thing for bad weather days. As long as you have a decent-sized counter, a butane burner and/or induction plate and a wash basin will serve. One advantage of not having a permanent stove and sink is you can stow the basin to make more room for cooking and stow the burner to make more room for clean-up. And you can take it all outside when the weather is nice, so there’s no duplication of appliances.

One safety warning on the butane burners... You cannot use larger pots that overhang the fuel canisters.

I agree with Jon. I ordered my 2014 Parkliner without a stove and never missed it in the 5 years I owned it. I used the butane cooker outside if the weather was good, or inside if not. I really liked having the extra counter space in the trailer. I did like the convenience of the inside sink. My current 2016 P/L has the same configuration.

-- Anne

SnowballCamper 06-21-2020 01:27 PM

You do what you want
 
For us, the whole point of the camper is to be able to get out of the weather. So not having a cooktop and sink would be a non-starter. In practice we do a LOT of Dutch oven cooking with charcoal. But weíve learned that cleanup is best done outside to preserve grey tank space, and having a tub that fits in the sink makes this easy and efficient. Itís also nice not to have multiple fuel sources to keep track of...

steve dunham 06-21-2020 01:46 PM

When we go camping , we want to make sure we have options
Propane , 12VDC , Indoor / outdoor cooking facilities , furnace / heat , bathroom , awning , A/C etc gives you options when it’s pouring rain , or it’s cold , or it’s windy , or the sun is beating down or the humidity / insects is /are so thick you can cut it with a knife or it’s snowing When you eliminate every option you might as well camp in a tent

If going camping means I have to be miserable then I ain’t going

neparker 06-21-2020 02:12 PM

The points about multiple fuel sources and having options are well taken. The last butane cooktop I bought is actually dual fuel, propane or butane. And has a hose to connect to a refillable propane cylinder. Here's one example: https://www.amazon.com/GS-3900P-Port...s%2C161&sr=8-3

Glenn Baglo 06-21-2020 03:42 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jon in AZ (Post 782683)
One safety warning on the butane burners... You cannot use larger pots that overhang the fuel canisters.


I can verify this statement. Daughter and son-in-law placed a large frying pan on my butane stove. Reflected heat caused the butane cylinder to explode. Fragments were embedded in their cooler and shredded their tent fly. They were lucky nobody was near the stove.
They didn't want to use my new ( expensive ) butane stove on a recent camping trip, but once I explained the operator error they recanted. They loved how the butane stove heated a pot of water in a few minutes, unlike their propane stove.

Cliff Hotchkiss 06-21-2020 03:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steve dunham (Post 782716)
When we go camping , we want to make sure we have options
Propane , 12VDC , Indoor / outdoor cooking facilities , furnace / heat , bathroom , awning , A/C etc gives you options when itís pouring rain , or itís cold , or itís windy , or the sun is beating down or the humidity / insects is /are so thick you can cut it with a knife or itís snowing When you eliminate every option you might as well camp in a tent

If going camping means I have to be miserable then I ainít going

🤔 Good point!

Jon in AZ 06-21-2020 03:54 PM

Thoughts on switching to an outdoor kitchen...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo (Post 782731)
I can verify this statement. Daughter and son-in-law placed a large frying pan on my butane stove. Reflected heat caused the butane cylinder to explode. Fragments were embedded in their cooler and shredded their tent fly. They were lucky nobody was near the stove.

I remember that post. Your experience and the dialogue that followed is exactly what alerted me to the issue. Since large pots and pans are the norm for us at our current season of life, itís propane for now, with separate stoves for inside and outside.

Arthur II 06-21-2020 04:50 PM

Ultimately Up To You ... BUT
 
You stated:


"Matt and I are both over 6 feet tall so actually can't stand up straight to be able to cook comfortably anyway!"

Being just under 6' 4", I know what it's like to deal with
a lower ceiling. I will never do so again. So, I have
to wonder just how much you plan to use the camper.
If quite a bit, I would bet you'll opt for something
different before too long. If a very limited use, then
perhaps you can deal with having a crooked neck at
the time.


With that in mind, I would say to do it the way you

want ... but perhaps in such a way that if you decide
to sell ... it would be easy to modify and add an indoor
kitchen space.



Hope that made sense ... just the ramblings of an old RVer.

Casita Greg 06-21-2020 06:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo (Post 782731)
I can verify this statement. Daughter and son-in-law placed a large frying pan on my butane stove. Reflected heat caused the butane cylinder to explode. Fragments were embedded in their cooler and shredded their tent fly. They were lucky nobody was near the stove.
They didn't want to use my new ( expensive ) butane stove on a recent camping trip, but once I explained the operator error they recanted. They loved how the butane stove heated a pot of water in a few minutes, unlike their propane stove.

I have one of those same Iwatani butane stoves too. Fantastic little unit. I don't take it camping, but not that it wouldn't be a good accompaniment. I have it at home and it has proven invaluable during power outages, since our house is "all electric." You don't want to be around my house in the morning without the ability to brew a pot of coffee, (and I don't drink it.):eek:

Jann Todd 06-21-2020 08:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aloepp (Post 782611)
Hello! I am new here and am enjoying reading through all the forums for tips and tricks.

My fiancť and I recently bought a 1977 Beachcomber that overall is in pretty good condition and really just needs a good makeover. The plan is to take a road trip from Vancouver down the coast to the Pacific Coast Highway for our honeymoon after our wedding next summer (fingers crossed covid will allow this...)

My dad is a carpenter so with his help and direction we decided to gut the interior and start from scratch to make things more functional. We are currently in the planning stage and are considering what to do about the interior kitchen. To make better use of the space I am thinking that we may move to an outdoor cooking set up rather than re-install the burner and sink. Matt and I are both over 6 feet tall so actually can't stand up straight to be able to cook comfortably anyway! We tent camp a lot and enjoy cooking outdoors so this wouldn't be new to us. We would still have a countertop space and a fridge but that would basically be it for interior amenities.

I wonder though what your thoughts here are about this in terms of down the line re-sale value. Would it be ill-advisable to not include these amenities?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

AL

If you are thinking resale value I'd put in a 2 burner stove and a sink. Also if it is raining hard and blowing which it seems to d0 a lot now then you may need to make food or hot drinks indoors. If it is cold and you want a hot drink you won't want to go outside in the dark and do it. We cook in our trailer all the time. I hate fighting the bugs and mosquitos to do things outdoors like cooking. I like comfort and ease of things. We have a wet bath but don't use the shower much. We use campground bathrooms for showers. About 3 years ago my husband got food poisoning from eating out and was violently ill all night in the bathroom. So happy we had the bathroom. We were a long way from the campground ones and he couldn't even make it out the door of the trailer. So again comfort is utmost for us.

Lee Senn 06-27-2020 12:09 PM

Outdoor cooking
 
Just an alternate take on outdoor cooking . I am active on the teardrop trailer forum as well as this one . Probably 999 out of 1000 teardrops have a rear outdoor kitchen and they all do just fine . Actually it is in many way a positive . When we are all cooking it becomes kind of a communal thing with lots of shared recipes and interesting aromas and conversations . p,s, by the way if it is windy , rainy , or too cold there is always that great invention called a sandwich available . Lee and Norma


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