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Dax 01-08-2021 09:19 PM

Havasu Insulation - CeraTex?
 
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Does anyone have any experience or thoughts on using CeraTex 3170 (from Amazon) or other Ceramic Fiber Paper for insulation? I'd like to rip out the carpet in my Havasu and add a bit of insulation and replace with wall material that won't trap as much dust.

I already decided not to use Reflectix nor spray foam and am thinking of either CeraTex or 1/2" Foamular + Thinsulate for the curved areas. I'd add some thin wood framing for stability and either cover the walls with foam backed PE panels and the ceiling (curved areas) with foam backed marine vinyl headliner OR the whole thing with the headliner.

Open to other recommendations. Thanks! Pic is from our first trip out just a couple of weeks ago - can't wait to paint her!

Jon Vermilye 01-09-2021 09:41 AM

Before I spent the $ & energy to install Certex, I'd want to know the "R" value of the material. It appears it is designed for high temperature insulation (kilns, etc) and may have a low enough "R" value to not be worth using.

Mike_L 01-09-2021 11:55 AM

I'm not familiar with this specific product however ceramic fiber insulation works well in high temperature applications, where exposure to chemicals may occur etc. If these fibers are released during installation or in use there may be some concerns. These small fibers may cause physical irritation to the skin and eyes. Airborne fibers or those settled on surfaces that may be introduced into the air may represent an inhalation hazard, potentially causing fibrotic lung disease and other complications. I suggest looking into this before using the product as this will be your sleeping quarters..

Dax 01-09-2021 03:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mike_L (Post 802255)
I'm not familiar with this specific product however ceramic fiber insulation works well in high temperature applications, where exposure to chemicals may occur etc. If these fibers are released during installation or in use there may be some concerns. These small fibers may cause physical irritation to the skin and eyes. Airborne fibers or those settled on surfaces that may be introduced into the air may represent an inhalation hazard, potentially causing fibrotic lung disease and other complications. I suggest looking into this before using the product as this will be your sleeping quarters..

Really good insight, thank you!

jerry theros 01-09-2021 09:30 PM

I used a product called lizard skin for the upper curved portion on my Havasu, wood panels on the walls. so far no problems, its been three years

Eric Frye 01-10-2021 09:12 AM

I would suggest you spend a couple of weeks researching insulation and R value interpretation. Understanding what the goal of insulation is attempting to accomplish is also important. For a camper or home, it is to slow the transfer of temperature for one side to the other. Specialty insulations like Ceramic fiber are more about handling high temps with out being destroyed than having increase insulating value. What makes for a good insulation is the ability to create multiple air gaps in the given space to limited air movement. Closed cell foam is great but varies base on the size of air bubbles it creates as it cures. Many manufactures used Ensolite before Reflectix was available. At the 1/4" thickness the difference is almost negligible but if you go to 1", the Ensolite is far superior, cost and weight not being a factor. In the end, thickness matters and just about all insulations have minimal impact in gaps less than an a couple of inches.

Real world example I also have an 1977 Airstream that I have been completely redoing and I have three different types of insulation in it. The wall gap through out is 1 1/2" and I have fiberglass, rockwool, and synthetic batting with aluminum backing (HVAC ducting insulation). On a sunny 95 degree day, the surface interior panel temperatures were within 1 degree degree of each other at 87 degrees.

Good luck with what every you choose

Dax 01-10-2021 02:41 PM

Thanks everyone. I've actually been researching for a while (there's a lot to learn, it's quite overwhelming) I saw a youtuber use the ceratex but wasn't able to find any more information on being used for camper insulation.

After reading these replies and reading even more and more information I'm fairly certain that I'm CeraTex is a bad idea and am going to retain the 1/2" XPS Foamular idea for the lower, straight walls and pick up with good ol' Ensolite for the curvier bits - and cover all of it with the padded vinyl marine headliner. Thinking of using Good stuff to make sure all my seams are protected too.


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